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     English Wordplay ~ Listen and Enjoy

FRANK SINATRA 1915-1998

I like anything that puts a smile on a person's face,
that can take the love from your heart
and let someone else feel it.

An American singer and actor.  He became a successful solo artist in the early to mid-1940s, being the idol of the "bobby soxers."

I've got you under my skin

He also forged a career as a dramatic actor, winning the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in From Here to Eternity.

PETER: You dropped out of school, got work in a local newspaper, and finally a tough job as a shipyard riveter.  You were great at singing.  Where did you learn to sing?
SINATRA: I sang almost as far back as I could remember.  Mom was always humming things, and I would try to verbalize along with her.  It was quite hysterical in the beginning.
PETER: There were several Frank Sinatras: the blue-eyed Italian boy who melted girls' hearts - from teenage bobby-soxers to Ava Gardner; the savvy singer who made a huge fortune; the tough gambling casino owner with connections to the mob and to political heavyweights from Kennedy to Reagan; and the poor boy who got rich but never forgot the poor and gave his time in charitable fundraising.  Who was the real Frank Sinatra?
SINATRA: All of them.  I had pre-planned to examine all of the strata of human existence, from the poorest of the poor to the rich and privileged; from the meek, mild, church-going life to the raucous outlaw.  I wanted a taste of everything.  I had set out to have a smorgasbord.
PETER: After initial success, everything began to collapse.
SINATRA: Part of the smorgasbord that I was engaged in was the dregs of what could happen to a person, if he went to extremes.  I thought I could do whatever I wanted and there would be no repercussions.  So I indulged myself with my physical wants and desires.  Those close to me suffered.
PETER: Religion was your mother's bailiwick early on, and when she died tragically in 1977 in a plane crash, you embraced Catholicism again fairly strongly.
SINATRA: It was both a reaction to her death and a reaching out to find some firmament, something to hang onto and give me a sense of identity and belonging.
PETER: How do you view religion today, particularly Catholicism?
SINATRA: I view all religions about the same from here, and that is that they are a set of physical laws and guidelines so that people don't have to think for themselves.  They can give their responsibilities to someone on high to direct them, and they don't have to feel, to connect with their soul and see where they're going.
PETER: Looking back now from Home on your successful but controversial life, what are the main lessons you learned?
SINATRA: In most of my previous lifetimes, I had not been particularly concerned with effects on other people, but as I went through the life review from this life as Frank Sinatra, it really came home to me how my actions influenced and affected others.  I am very near to the point of being able to be a guide because of all of the experiences I have had, not only in this lifetime but in others.  I can hear some of the critics out there now saying, "That son of a bitch is going to be a guide for somebody!"  And I laugh because that would have been my response, were I in physical form.

Toni comments: Energetically, Frank's soul was an extremely strong force.  Although it didn't really come out in the words, it was there energetically when he was thinking, "Oh yeah - I know that Joe Public really thought that I should be either venerated or hanged for what I had done, when all I was doing was just learning."


Talking with Twentieth Century Men
The foregoing are excerpts from Talking with Twentieth Century Men.
If you wish to purchase this book please go to the Celestial Voices website.
If you wish to learn more please go to these websites Messages from the Masters and The Masters' Blog.

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Please click below for information on a recommended CD set and for books about Frank Sinatra - and for Terry O'Neill's collection of photos.