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Sonnet 25

a cornucopia of a book
Read by Claire Marchionne
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A. L. Rowse in his Shakespeare's Sonnets writes:  This extremely revealing sonnet has a double meaning for us.  First it reveals Shakespeare's feelings about the restricted circumstances of his birth and fortune. Second it refers to Sir Walter Ralegh's fall from favour, which was the sensation of the year 1592.

Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, c.1564. In the background are the devices of the Order of Saint Michael and the Order of the Garter
Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester
In the background are the devices
of the Order of Saint Michael
and the Order of the Garter
Let those who are in favour with their stars
Of public honour and proud titles boast,
Whilst I, whom fortune of such triumph bars
Unlook'd for joy in that I honour most.
Great princes' favourites their fair leaves spread
But as the marigold at the sun's eye,
And in themselves their pride lies buried,
For at a frown they in their glory die.
The painful warrior famoused for fight,
After a thousand victories once foil'd,
Is from the book of honour razed quite,
And all the rest forgot for which he toil'd:
   Then happy I, that love and am belov'd,
   Where I may not remove nor be remov'd.

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